ISSUE 36: SPRING/SUMMER 2022
Dr. Kayleigh Eaves Temple, Editor

Your new digital ETDS newsletter.

As the costs of products, goods, and services continue to rise, we as a board looked at our budget to consider where we could cut expenditures. The cost of printing our newsletter is one of those costs we considered cutting. So, we’re trying out a digital newsletter. Do you love it? Hate it? Feel free to let us know….

Lessons From a Station Wagon

President’s Message

It is my hope that we will have enough young readers of this newsletter to require a history lesson about the nuances of a station wagon. While the “Woodie” was introduced around 1910, manufacturers started producing steel-bodied station wagons in the 1950s. By the time I was a child in the 1970s, the station wagon had been perfected in it’s body style to be what was essentially a sedan with 4 doors on the sides, a rear door that usually swung open (and seemed to weigh hundreds of pounds) and an extended body length for storage or passengers behind the second row of seats. Many station wagons of my era had a fake wood finish as trim on the side. The gas crisis and introduction of minivans eroded the market share of station wagons until the newer version of SUV seemed to totally replace what was once an icon of American family life.

As a child, my family would load tents, food, and clothes into a Ford LTD Station Wagon and hit the road for trips to KOA campgrounds across the west for weeks at a time. Never having a working AC in our older cars, all workable windows would be rolled down, and the conversations we had consisted of yelling or crawling over cargo to get close enough to others to speak in a more normal tone. Our wagon had a jump seat in the back that faced the rear, and my little sister and I would usually claim that area so as not to draw the wrath of our parents for whatever misdeeds we had in mind.

The occupants of the jump seat were in the same car as the passengers up front, but the experience they had on the same trip was vastly different. Rather than being forward-facing, those of us who sat in the back saw the things after they were passed. Different signs detailing things about where we had been, different views of the landscape, and different views of other vehicle occupants were the norm in that jump seat but completely foreign to the passengers up front. I remember describing things at rest stops to other family members that they were completely clueless about and hearing them describe things that I had never even seen. It’s always been comical to me that the jump seat provided a completely different view of the same trip.

As I have moved through life and been fortunate enough to be a part of a profession that allows me to have many different experiences with so many people of different backgrounds, the lesson of that “jump seat” has always lingered in the recesses of my mind. The people we are fortunate enough to share this life with all have different perspectives as the roads traveled in their “jump seat” provided a different view than ours. As we live in what seems to be a more polarized world than ever, let’s learn to better understand the assimilation of life experiences that our peers and patients have, as we can often find understanding in others when we truly seek to learn their life’s experiences. Let’s seek to reach out to professional peers with a different insight into our profession and dental organization so that we can all live a better life where we profit from others’ insights. And let’s all strive to find those who are interested enough in our own experience with organized dentistry that we might be able to convince them to join us in our common “jump seat.”

Finally, I would like to give thanks to all who have allowed me to serve this second term as your ETDS President. As I’ve written before, our organization functions well because of its member participation and the work of our Board. I move from this post to serve you as a TDA Director, and please know that I will always be available should any of you have a need that I might be able to fulfill.

Best Regards,
Mark Camp

It is my hope that we will have enough young readers of this newsletter to require a history lesson about the nuances of a station wagon. While the “Woodie” was introduced around 1910, manufacturers started producing steel-bodied station wagons in the 1950s. By the time I was a child in the 1970s, the station wagon had been perfected in its body style to be what was essentially a sedan with four doors on the sides, a rear door that usually swung open (and seemed to weigh hundreds of pounds) and an extended body length for storage or passengers behind the second row of seats. Many station wagons of my era had a faux wood finish as trim on the side. The gas crisis and introduction of minivans eroded the market share of station wagons until the newer version of SUV seemed to totally replace what was once an icon of American family life.

As a child, my family would load tents, food, and clothes into a Ford LTD Station Wagon and hit the road for trips to KOA campgrounds across the west for weeks at a time. Never having a working AC in our older cars, all workable windows would be rolled down, and the conversations we had consisted of yelling or crawling over cargo to get close enough to others to speak in a more normal tone. Our wagon had a jump seat in the back that faced the rear, and my little sister and I would usually claim that area so as not to draw the wrath of our parents for whatever misdeeds we had in mind.

The occupants of the jump seat were in the same car as the passengers up front, but the experience they had on the same trip was vastly different. Rather than being forward-facing, those of us who sat in the back saw the things after they were passed. Different signs detailing things about where we had been, different views of the landscape, and different views of other vehicle occupants were the norm in that jump seat but completely foreign to the passengers up front. I remember describing things at rest stops to other family members that they were completely clueless about and hearing them describe things that I had never even seen. It’s always been comical to me that the jump seat provided a completely different view of the same trip.

As I have moved through life and been fortunate enough to be a part of a profession that allows me to have many different experiences with so many people of different backgrounds, the lesson of that “jump seat” has always lingered in the recesses of my mind. The people we are fortunate enough to share this life with all have different perspectives as the roads traveled in their “jump seat” provided a different view than ours. As we live in what seems to be a more polarized world than ever, let’s learn to better understand the assimilation of life experiences that our peers and patients have, as we can often find understanding in others when we truly seek to learn their life’s experiences. Let’s seek to reach out to professional peers with a different insight into our profession and dental organization so that we can all live a better life where we profit from others’ insights. And let’s all strive to find those who are interested enough in our own experience with organized dentistry that we might be able to convince them to join us in our common “jump seat.”

Finally, I would like to give thanks to all who have allowed me to serve this second term as your ETDS President. As I’ve written before, our organization functions well because of its member participation and the work of our Board. I move from this post to serve you as a TDA Director, and please know that I will always be available should any of you have a need that I might be able to fulfill.

Best Regards,
Mark Camp

clinically speaking

By: Dr. Lynette Ogletree

In April 2021, a patient had a tragic accident taking a baseball bat to the face. A D1, major league prospect was left unconscious and seizing. Three days after being life-flighted and held for seizures and concussion protocol, the patient showed up to me to begin restoration. He presented with a swollen lip with multiple sutures inside and outside the mouth and multiple broken teeth (Figure A). The patient presented with #6 ejected, #7 fractured at the gum line and in a few pieces, #8 fractured in half, and #9 chipped. Upon x-rays and 3-D imaging, number six presented with its root tip still left in the bone, along with third molars and a supernumerary tooth at site #20 (Figures B, C, and D). Amazingly, the patient had not lost any bone on the facials and it appeared the bat hit the teeth directly and left the bone in the zygomatic arch intact.

The patient engaged in a long treatment plan that day. The oral surgeon got him in immediately to retrieve the root tip at site #6 and graft but declined sedation and the removal of the other 5 teeth. The patient returned to me for a root canal and post on #7, #6 cantilever, and #7-10 crowns. A removable flipper or essix retainer was not an option per the patient. The patient also wanted to correct #10 position without orthodontics. Saving #7 was crucial in us building a long-term fixed temporary with #6 as a cantilever.

Fall of 2021, the patient had the implant placed at site #6, along with third molar removal and the supernumerary #20. He was also going through counseling for concussion trauma and neuro suggested hyperbaric oxygen chamber treatments to help with cognitive function in the brain and healing of the implant area. December 2021, the patient was cleared to begin final restorations. The patient did at-home whitening sporadically while continuing his smokeless tobacco use. The implant crown #6 would stand-alone and single crowns #7-10 (Figure E). Comparing #7 at the time of implant placement versus the time of restoration reveals a long-term hopeless prognosis noted by some external resorption (Figure F, E). The patient understood an implant will be needed at #7 in future; in the meantime, the temporary was cemented to buy him some time in the life of his dental health.

The patient was very happy and expressed that getting his smile back helped his self-confidence, esteem, and outlook on life (Figure G).

None of these are professional photos, and they were the furthest thing from my mind. Enjoy the fruits of your labor, and enjoy giving others, often, their life back. The opportunity we have to make a difference in a life is a privilege.

The patient engaged in a long treatment plan that day. The oral surgeon got him in immediately to retrieve the root tip at site #6 and graft but declined sedation and the removal of the other 5 teeth. The patient returned to me for a root canal and post on #7, #6 cantilever, and #7-10 crowns. A removable flipper or essix retainer was not an option per the patient. The patient also wanted to correct #10 position without orthodontics. Saving #7 was crucial in us building a long-term fixed temporary with #6 as a cantilever.

Fall of 2021, the patient had the implant placed at site #6, along with third molar removal and the supernumerary #20. He was also going through counseling for concussion trauma and neuro suggested hyperbaric oxygen chamber treatments to help with cognitive function in the brain and healing of the implant area. December 2021, the patient was cleared to begin final restorations. The patient did at-home whitening sporadically while continuing his smokeless tobacco use. The implant crown #6 would stand-alone and single crowns #7-10 (Figure E). Comparing #7 at the time of implant placement versus the time of restoration reveals a long-term hopeless prognosis noted by some external resorption (Figure F, E). The patient understood an implant will be needed at #7 in future; in the meantime, the temporary was cemented to buy him some time in the life of his dental health.

The patient was very happy and expressed that getting his smile back helped his self-confidence, esteem, and outlook on life (Figure G).

None of these are professional photos, and they were the furthest thing from my mind. Enjoy the fruits of your labor, and enjoy giving others, often, their life back. The opportunity we have to make a difference in a life is a privilege.

TDA House Wrap-Up

By: Kyle King

The TDA House of Delegates recently met May 5th-7th at the Lost Pines Resort in Bastrop, TX. With much of the discussion at the House regarding New Dentist (ND) involvement in the TDA, we were strongly represented with 80% of our delegation being in that cohort, consisting of: Dr. Wade Barker (ND), Dr. Kyle King (ND), Dr. Madison Mack (ND), Dr. Clayton Windham (ND), as well as Dr. Mark Camp.

While some years consist of intense deliberation, discussion, and lengthy meetings, this was not one of those years (thankfully). As aforementioned, much of the discussion involved studying the potential of adding a New Dentist position on the TDA Board to increase involvement; time will tell if it is necessary moving forward. Membership dues at the TDA have not changed in the past several years, and another impact to expect is the increase of $20 for the coming year.

Dr. Deborah Worsham delivered her presidential recap and remarks to the House with a standing ovation. Her charismatic leadership has been greatly revered, and she will certainly be missed. We sincerely appreciate all she has done not only for our local ETDS, but the entirety of the Texas Dental Association. Dr. Duke Ho assumed the role as TDA President at the conclusion of the House, and with the midterms on the horizon, we look forward to his leadership in this election cycle.

SEPTEMBER SPEAKER SPOTLIGHT:

DR. UCHE ODIATU, DMD

50 Shades of Inflammation: the Mouth-Body-Mind Connection!

Want to learn about “permanent lifestyle change” and SLASH your patients’ disease risk? There is an avalanche of evidence demonstrating the connection between your patients’ mouths with modern lifestyle habits: lack of sleep (saps their discipline), shift work (after 4 night-shifts blood sugar is elevated), poorly managed stress (shows up in every cell of their body), overeating (high fat & processed food boosts inflammation), and sedentary living (did you know “Sitting is the New Smoking?”). And it’s bi-directional; the oral environment has far-reaching effects on the rest of the body.
Patients appreciate the dental health professional who sees the bigger picture and truly understands the relationship between the body, mind & mouth. Set yourself apart from the pack and develop a VALUE ADDED PRACTICE. Stop the deadly “rock n roll” cascade with specific dental & lifestyle solutions guaranteed to change your patients’ health destiny. This fact-filled & inspirational program is a ‘call to arms’ against “party all night” inflammation – “let’s douse the flames!”

Want to learn about “permanent lifestyle change” and SLASH your patients’ disease risk? There is an avalanche of evidence demonstrating the connection between your patients’ mouths with modern lifestyle habits: lack of sleep (saps their discipline), shift work (after 4 night-shifts blood sugar is elevated), poorly managed stress (shows up in every cell of their body), overeating (high fat & processed food boosts inflammation), and sedentary living (did you know “Sitting is the New Smoking?”). And it’s bi-directional; the oral environment has far-reaching effects on the rest of the body.

Patients appreciate the dental health professional who sees the bigger picture and truly understands the relationship between the body, mind & mouth. Set yourself apart from the pack and develop a VALUE ADDED PRACTICE. Stop the deadly “rock n roll” cascade with specific dental & lifestyle solutions guaranteed to change your patients’ health destiny. This fact-filled & inspirational program is a ‘call to arms’ against “party all night” inflammation – “let’s douse the flames!”

Learning Objectives:
  1. Expand your knowledge of the BODY-MOUTH connection
  2. Understand why certain patients do not respond well to your hygiene programs
  3. Learn how periodontitis increases the odds of someone developing insulin resistance two-fold.
  4. Recognize the destructive INFLAMMATORY CASCADE in your patients.
  5. See that insurance companies are beginning to recognize the power of enhanced dental coverage to lower hospital costs & decrease MD visits for their diabetic patients
  6. Make the connection between diabetes, insulin resistance, & inflammation
  7. Learn how to spot the SLEEP DEPRIVED PATIENT. Hint, 30% of Americans are shift workers and are living in a “jet lag” state.
  8. Discover how visceral fat behaves like an active organ releasing inflammatory cytokines causing havoc throughout the entire body & mouth.
  9. Learn the new science on GUT FLORA – human microbiome, probiotics and prebiotics
  10. Spot how stress shows up in your patient’s mouth
  11. Develop a VALUE-ADDED PRACTICE inspire patients to become RAVING FANS!
  12. Understand how chronic dehydration adversely influences your patient’s biochemistry
  13. Calculate BMI (Body Mass Index) easily for yourself or your patient
  14. Identify 7 KEY foods & lifestyle habits that contribute to inflammation – EAT THIS NOT THAT!
  15. Learn which exercises best fight inflammation in your body
  16. Put into practice some simple solutions to modify your patient’s behavior
  17. Implement a new dimension to your treatment planning
  18. Become confident and learn the language of wellness
  19. Learn an easy two-minute script to educate & motivate your patients
  20. Develop leadership strategies to get your entire office on board focusing on whole body health.
  21. Create a circle of influence with allied health professionals (RMT’s, DC’s, RD and CPT’s)

Dr. Uche Odiatu, DMD

Dr. Uche Odiatu is the author of The Miracle of Health, a professional member of the American College of Sports Medicine and a practicing dentist in Toronto. This busy health care professional is an NSCA Certified Personal Trainer, Certified Yoga Instructor, Certified Boot Camp Instructor and has given 500 plus lectures in England, Canada, the USA, the Bahamas, Denmark, Jamaica, Bermuda and Norway. He has lectured at the American Dental Association Annual session 14 times since 2006. 

www.DrUche.com  | Twitter @FitSpeakers | Instagram @FitSpeakers

UPCOMING EVENTS:

April 19, 2024

Speaker: J. William Robbins, D.D.S., M.A
Topic: A 50 Year Retrospective - My Failures and Lessons Learned
Location: The Summit Club
3700 Judson Rd., Longview, TX 75605
GOOGLE MAPS | APPLE MAPS
Interactive Zoom Available
Registration: 8-8:30
Class: 8:30-3:30
CE Credits: 6
Lunch provided for Doctors and Staff

Cost:
See Sidebar for info

September 20, 2024

Speaker: Dr. Kitrina G. Cordell, DDS
Topic: Pathology
Location: Green Acres Baptist Church - Crosswalk Center
Interactive Zoom Available
Registration: 8-8:30
Class: 8:30-3:30
CE Credits: 6

Cost:
See Sidebar for info

CE Requirements
for Dentists

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CE Requirements
for Hygienists

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CE Requirements
for Assistants

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